Habit Tracking August: A Complete Failure

I have previously posted about a new system I have adopted for tracking my habits. In the month of July, I think I did reasonably well in sticking to the habits I have set out to adopt. My system is designed to make it easy to enter data (simply use a marker pen) and to provide an immediate visual overview of how well things are going.

For July, it is easy to see that there is a lot more green than there is red or yellow. I didn’t do perfectly but I managed to exercise, mediate and learn quite regularly as can be seen in the below image.

Alas in the last month, things seemed to have gone horribly wrong:

  • I only managed to exercise four times in the entire month
  • I didn’t manage to wake up at my desired time (5:30 am) even once
  • I only meditated five times and not at all in the second half of the months
  • I didn’t follow through with my learning (a small touch typing exercise) in the last 1.5 weeks of the months.

I think the success in sticking to my habits is a good reflection of how well I felt in the past month. I was struggling with a cold for most of the month and for the past week my wife and I went to New Zealand for business travel which complicated realising my habits.

I think it is very interesting that my ability to stick to habits correlates with my well-being. I wonder what is the cause and effect relationship here; I would assume that it would go both ways; that I am better at sticking to my habits when I am feeling well but also that sticking to the particular habits I choose makes me feel better.

I think I especially need to find a better way for struggling with a cold; maybe do some very light exercise rather than none at all. But I am also conscious that, when feeling unwell, one of the best things to do is to rest and not to stress out about all the things we ought to do.

Interestingly I think I also gained some weight in the past month. I weighed myself at the gym of the hotel were we were staying and I weighed 76 kg, which is I think a few kilograms more than I usually weigh. I am thinking if I should start tracking my weight as well as an additional metric to track how well I am doing overall.

Image credit: The Digital Artist

Simple Habit Tracking System

I have long been looking for a system that helps me stick to good habits. I used a time tracking application on my iPhone and also created various spreadsheets. Unfortunately the solutions I found so far turned out to be too cumbersome to enter data (spreadsheets) or too difficult to run reports on (time tracking apps).

I’ve recently read the book Joy, Inc. by Richard Sheridan and one of the interesting points discussed was that the profiled company uses pen, paper and cardboard cards to plan, design and track their work. This gave me the idea that I could try to create a paper-based system to track my success in sticking to a number of habits.

This is the system that I came up with:

  • Create a table where the columns are the days in a month and the rows represent different habits
  • If a habit was successfully practised in a day, mark the corresponding cell as green.
  • If a habit has not been practised in three days, mark the cell corresponding to the third day yellow.
  • If a habit has not been practices for four days or longer, mark all days after the third as red.

For the first month, July 2019, I decided to track the following habits:

  • Exercise: Any form of exercise done during the day (just being active, such as walking or taking the bike does not count)
  • Stretching: Any form of stretching
  • Posture: Any attempt made by me during the day to correct and improve my posture
  • Meditation: Mediate for at least five minutes
  • Create: Work on some form of artifact, such as a piece of writing or code
  • Learn: Spend some time learning to touch type and/or to draw

This is how I tracked for each one of them:

It seems that I have some way to go until I practise all the habits I have set out to do daily. However I have also not completely failed at any of the habits and were able to practice them in 30-50% of the days of the last month. I am particularly pleased at my progress for the Learn habit. I was able to improve my proficiency for typing some tricky constructs required for programming quite significantly. Unfortunately I don’t think I have gotten any better at drawing.

Overall I quite liked this system, it was easy to follow and provided me with a good overview of how I was tracking day by day as well as for the month overall. For the next month, I will follow a slightly modified version with a changed set of habits.

Picture credit: Free-Photos

Practices for Enlightenment

I believe we all have moments in which we become the best versions of ourselves; moments in which we are ever so slightly closer to true and deep enlightenment.

Unfortunately, these moments are rare and we digress from whatever insights we have gained easily. For instance, we might realise that binge watching television brings little happiness into our lives but comes with significant costs such as less time to spent with family and friends or for our health. We might then decide to spent less time watching television and more time on more meaningful endeavours.

This decision alone, however, is not sufficient for the outcome we decide upon to manifest. Often, we will try for a few days but then the hustle and bustle of life engulfs us and we quickly forget what we have set out to do.

I believe that to attain wisdom and foster goodness in our lives, we need to constantly remind ourselves of what is most important to us. So that, once we have decided to be good and happy, we can stand a chance against the demands of everyday life. One of the ways to do that is by following a set of practices: sequences of steps we do regularly and with a spiritual purpose.

This has motivated me to design the following simple practices, which may help in achieving a more balanced, meaningful and enlightened life:

I believe these practices can enable us to be stronger and wiser. Of course, we need to find a way to embed them into our lives in a regular manner, for instance every morning or every evening; since a practice can only unfold its power when practised repeatedly.

Featured Image: Source